First Person Artist

First Person Artist

Artist Interview, Blogging about Being an Artist

First Person Artist: by Kimberly Brooks

Fellow Artists and Art Lovers~
In addition to preparing for my upcoming show in the spring, in the past few months I’ve taken some of the thoughts and conversations I normally have with other artists and turned it into a weekly column on the Huffington Post. I call the column “First Person Artist” and it features myself and other contemporary artists who share their thoughts and inspirations. So far, I’ve touched upon topics ranging including, the environment, feminism, war, death, religion, technology, from Jesus, Barbie to spiderman. I see it as an extension of what I do in the studio and being a part of the art community. I’m interviewing some wonderful artists in all kinds of mediums with many more to come.

Greatest Hits include:
The Creative Process in Eight Stages
The Defiant Iranian Painter Abelina Galustian
From Miami Basel with Love
You can find the column on the home page of the Huffington Post every Saturday and the cover of its “Living Section” all weekend. To view all the columns go to

http://www.firstpersonartist.com

Enjoy~
Kimberly Brooks

P.S. If you like what you see, please let the Huffington Post know by clicking “I’m a Fan of this Blogger”, you can also get weekly email alerts if you desire.
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Leah Lehmbeck: Mom’s Friends

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The F-Word (“Feminism”) in Art by Leah Lehmbeck
On New Paintings by Kimberly Brooks

With Nancy Pelosi having taken her historic position at the rostrum and Hillary Clinton hitting the presidential campaign trail, we have undoubtedly entered a new era of feminism. The F-word is once again being bandied about, as is that perennial question, “Can we have it all?” And it is thus no surprise to find that in her latest series, “Mom’s Friends,” the artist Kimberly Brooks adds a new voice to the debate. In making her starting point her childhood in Marin County in the 1970s, Brooks concentrates on women who are, according to her, “endlessly fascinating and mysterious . . . particularly because they were in such a state of transition.” While Brooks explores the theme of womanhood through the imagery of female liberation some thirty years ago, she is also able to investigate to the complex relationship between reality, memory and representation.

The “woman question” has been continually up for discussion since the inception of modern feminism in the late 1960s. As universal as this topic is Brooks was specifically inspired by her role as the mother of a young daughter, saying in her artist statement: “Now that I am a mother with a daughter of my own, I see the way she studies me and my friends, how she imitates the way I walk and talk or wants to traipse in my heels”. Recalling how she used to do the same, Brooks turned to her own mother for inspiration, using photographs from the 1970s of her mother and her mother’s friends (actual, and recreated with friends in vintage clothing) as the basis for her work. By presenting women who migrated to California from the Midwest and East Coast and consequently “melted their inhibitions, heated up their styles and . . . shed previous notions of themselves,” Brooks’s paintings fix us at a significant time and place vis-à-vis the role of women. Indeed, beginning in the 1970s many of the women of that generation sought, for the first time, to forge their identities apart from their husbands and families. And it is this feature–their newfound autonomy–that Brooks presents, and inevitably positions, against the current state of feminism in her work.

Read whole review >

The Whole Story, Solo Exhibition

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In my series of paintings, “The Whole Story”, I investigate the roles of woman as artists and subjects of the. I appropriate erotic imagery of women in the early twentieth century to target a historical moment when the artist-model relationship was surrounded with sexual myths and Bohemian fantasies. I reverses roles and offer another way of viewing the female body, other than the assumption that such images are directed only to a male spectator. This includes recreating poses using myself and contemporary women as models. Fragmentation reflects the historical glorification of women’s body parts into elected zones of pleasure, while simultaneously interrupting the fluid trajectory of the male gaze. By assuming the role of the artist (and model) and recontextualizing these images, I place women as spectator, resituating control over the female image within a feminist representation.

I strive to advance the process; to explore the way viewing itself reinstates female power, becoming objects of her own vision. When even today there exists cultures who cover their women from head to toe, and others where flaunting is a right, notions of voyeurism, objectification and empowerment become even more relevant.