Introducing My Narrative Painting Project

Thank you for being a part of this experiment where I will send a painting with a short story/thought behind it every few weeks.

I have longed for a way shine a light on what happens after the presentation or what doesn’t get seen.  Not a “blog” or even, perhaps, a fully-formed thought.  But a handkerchief of a thought, something i might leave behind while riding to where ever– a postcard from the interior– ah that’s what I’ll call it…an image and some words, that’s all.

I have spent my life listening, feeling with my eyes. I have many paintings I have never shown or older paintings I haven’t seen in years.

I want to let you in.

 

LEONARDO’S BRAIN by Leonard Shlain

LeonardosBrainCover

LEONARDO’S BRAIN NEWS & REVIEWS

It is with great joy and gratitude that I announce the posthumous publishing of my father, Leonard Shlain’s last book, Leonardo’s Brain: Understanding Da Vinci’s Creative Genius which he completed shortly before he passed five years ago.

The book is available online and in bookstores now. My siblings and I are hosting events to celebrate the book’s release in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco this fall.

Many of you already know about Leonard Shlain’s previous books, Art & Physics,The Alphabet vs The Goddess and Sex, Time and Power, or were lucky enough to attend one of his presentations. Otherwise you may have learned about him by my Technicolor Summer Exhibition, the articles I have published about our vigil or the flowers or when I dedicated the founding of the Science and Art Meets Science sections to him.

Leonardo’s Brain is not only one of his grand intellectual journeys akin to his previous books, but also has a particularly special meaning as synthesizes of so many of his ideas connecting neurology, history, philosophy, art, science and ourselves, holding Da Vinci as a harbinger of how our species could evolve.

We have so many people to thank — from our publisher John Sternfeld at Lyon’s Press (now Globe Pequot), Robert Stricker, his long time literary agent and particularly Andy Ross, the literary agent for Leonardo’s Brain who seized the opportunity to bring this book to market with zeal our father would have loved.  We also want to thank Ann Patty, (The Life of Pi) who helped us edit the final manuscript. The act of conversing with his ideas in our minds as we navigated the different stages of the editing and publication process was one of the greatest gifts of all.

 

Seven Rings: Artist Telephone

Today I played 7 Rings, the game created by Rebecca Campbell and Nicole Walker on the Huffington Post.   Each participant has 24 hours to respond to the previous artist’s work.  I was responding to the poem below by Alison Deming called The Mirror.


“Chains for Alison” 2010, gouche on paper, 9″ x 12″ Kimberly Brooks

THE MIRROR

Once I had a cat who studied himself
in the mirror. He didn’t know
what it was in there staring back at him
but he couldn’t stop looking
because the face never turned away
and eyes meeting eyes
want more seeing. It’s already dark.
No moonlight. No whippoorwill–
the bird that tormented my childhood
refusing to take on the night
without incessant song. That bird
must have been the size of a fire hydrant,
something alarming anyway, I thought then,
but learned later it was just a pip
of feathered life with a voice
insistent as the news, that continuity
of disaster and argument to which
we all belong–bomb in recruiting office,
stoning in public square, crude oil
in everyone’s hair, to mosque or not
to mosque. Don’t turn away. It’s just
the brute world that will outlive us,
the lean hard muscle of it
flexing. But the birds
don’t belong, they are settling
into the night, their feathered quilts
ready-made. Some of them
are rising out of their bodies, whole
categories of bodies, and into
the being of non-being where of course
we’re all headed after a few more parties
and fixations of eyes upon eyes. But first
who doesn’t want to make something
of it, the clutch of childhood’s
solitary rages and the way the face
begins to cave in on itself with age
so that it looks like an Arizona landscape,
all contour and defile, telling the outcome
of its story to everyone, leaving out
a few details, so that a person might stare at
himself and say, Don’t I know you from
somewhere? You look so familiar and yet . . .

Alison Deming was responding to self portraits by Don Bachardy.


Don Bachardy, Untitled,  2010, Acrylic on Paper, Aprox. 24″ x 36″

7 Rings is a game of artist telephone that we launched on August 2nd.  I wrote about the overall concept for the game here.

Editorial

SELECTED ESSAYS

The Creative Process in Eight Stages
Rockstars, Orphans and Rescue Missions
Art of the Headshot
Why Artists Shouldn’t Have Blackberries
The Macho Art World
The Painting Whisperer vs. The Anxiety of Abstraction
Artist as Exhibitionist
Artist Porn
Michele Obama, Master Colorist and Me
Judging a Campaign by it’s Colors
What Climate Change Might Look Like
Mothers Against Plastic
The Gap Logo, New Coke and The Legendary Walter Landor
If I Were Queen: Kids & Screens
Art & Physics and Me
A Vigil for my Father, Leonard Shlain
Facebook and the Death of Mystery

Selected Artist Interviews

First Person Artist
Nudist And the Chemist: Ethan Murrow
Photography Undergoes a Sex Change: Tom Chambers
Painting Evolution Liat Yossifor
The Wonderful World of Kirsten Hassenfeld
Defiant Iranian Painter Abelina Galustian
Stephanie Schneider and the End of Polaroid
Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test
Dancing With Divorced Men: Allison Kaufman
America Screaming: Liz Markus
Fear & Faith: Rebecca Campbell
Recreating History: Angela Dufresne

FOUNDING EDITOR

Founding Arts Editor, Huffington Post
Highlights & Milestones
Merging Arts with Culture
Introducing Huffington Post Arts