2019 Untitled Art Fair, San Francisco

 

The View From Here, 60 x 48 in. Oil on Linen 2019

Dear Friends,

I’m thrilled to announce my upcoming exhibition at the Untitled Art Fair in San Francisco with Zevitas Marcus. It’s funny how life works– I’ve shown my work all over the country but this is the first show in my hometown of the Bay Area. I’m super excited to see family and old friends and wrote an instagram post about all that here.

UNTITLED ART, San Francisco

Pier 35
Booth #19 Zevitas Marcus
1454 The Embarcadero
San Francisco

Days & Hours
THU JAN 17 3-9 VIP PREVIEW
FRI Jan 18 12:00 pm -8:00 pm
SAT Jan 19 12:00 pm -6:00 pm
SUN Jan 20 12:00 pm -6:00 pm

I’ll make it a point to loiter near the booth at these times:

Thurs, Jan 17, 5 – 7pm
Friday, Jan 18 3 – 4pm
Sat, Jan 19 3 – 4pm

For a preview of paintings, please contact Rich [at] Zevitasmarcus [dot] com

2019 “Paintings from the Interior”, UC Riverside

Saturday, January 19, 2019 at 6 PM – 9 PM

UCR ARTS Block
3824 Main St, Riverside, California 92501

Paintings from the Interior, curated by Andi Campognone, is a survey exhibition of painting in and about the inland region of southern California. With a specific geographic boundary east of Kellogg Hill in Los Angeles county to the low and high deserts of San Bernardino and Riverside counties, this exhibit focuses on both the literal landscape and the conceptual imagery of place. Artists featured in this exhibit are Dawn Arrowsmith, Quinton Bemiller, Diane Best, Jorin Bossen, Justin Bower, Gary Brewer, Kimberly Brooks, Terry Chacon, Gerald Clarke, Hollis Cooper, Cosme Cordova, Alex Couwenberg, Chick Curtis, Joshua Dildine, Steven Hampton, Salomon Huerta, Brian Johnson, Stevie Love, Aline Mare, Kevin Stewart Magee, Donna Morin, Andrea Patrie, Roland Reiss, David C. Rosales, Ruth Pastine, Thomas Pathe, Bradford J. Salamon, Jeff Soto, Sharon Suhovy, Juan Thorp, Chris Trueman, and Mark Dean Veca

2019 “Disclosure” at Durden & Ray, Los Angeles

DISCLOSURE: CONFESSIONS FOR MODERN TIMES

Jan 5 – Feb 2, 2019
Opening reception:
Saturday, Jan. 5, 2019,
7-10 p.m

Artists: Kim Abeles, Jorin Bossen, Kimberly Brooks, Joe Davidson, Dani Dodge, Donald Fodness, Kathryn Hart, Debby and Larry Kline, Conchi Sanford, Ed “Celso” Tahaney and Steven Wolkoff, Curators: Dani Dodge and Alanna Marcelletti

Durden and Ray will celebrate the start of 2019 with an exhibition that allows people to cleanse their souls through the art of disclosure. January is about cleansing the past and making new starts. But since the early 1990s, independent polls have shown the rapid growth of those without a religious affiliation. So where do people go to confess, if not to a higher power? Maybe an art gallery? Dani Dodge and Alanna Marcelletti decided to play devil’s advocates and create a space where the participants can disclose transgressions and progress unfettered into 2019 through art.

The exhibition includes interactive confessionals, each designed by different artists, and figurative art exploring the experience of being human through relationships, tragedy, translation of autobiography and Barry Manilow. The show is a contemporary take on the sacred and secular acts of confessing sins. Conchi Sanford’s confessional is composed of two see-through cocoons that allow people to whisper secrets to each other. Steven Wolkoff channels Bart Simpson with a piece on which people write what they will not do. Inside Kim Abeles’ confessional, people hear the sound of audio she collected one minute every day for 1440 minutes, or 24 hours, and Dani Dodge’s formal wooden confessional flashes “CONFESS” while inviting people to put their sins on display through Post-it notes. The figurative works in the show acknowledge the burden of unreleased guilt. Aesthetically, they are divided by the curators into their ideas of heaven, hell and in-between. Kimberly Brooks’ abstract figures exist in a heavenly realm, while Donald Fodness hellishly disassembles Barry Manilow. Debby and Larry Kline play prophet by mapping impending tragedy for the planet referencing Biblical plagues as they foretell natural and manmade disasters. In between are the paintings of a disconnected relationship by Jorin Bossen, and Ed “Celso” Tahaney’s vibrant take on the personal disclosures of Hollywood luminaries. Joe Davidson memorializes a life lived through concrete castings of the insides of his own shoes, while Kathryn Hart reveals her personal form of survivor guilt with a sculpture that includes found bone, which she refers to as a private confessional.

Durden & Ray
1206 Maple Ave. #832, Los Angeles, CA 90015
Hours: Sat/Sun, 12 – 5 p.m. and by appointment

Media Contact:
Dani Dodge, 213-703-9363
dani.dodge@gmail.com

SOLO EXHIBITION “Fever Dreams” Sept 27 – Dec 6, 2018


K I M B E R L Y   B R O O K S

“Fever Dreams
SEPT 27 – DEC 6, 2018
Mt. San Antonio College,
1100 N. Grand Avenue,
Walnut CA

August 28, 2018 | Walnut, CA — The Mt. San Antonio College Art Gallery is pleased to present Fever Dreams, a solo exhibition featuring new and small works spanning the career of Los Angeles-based artist KIMBERLY BROOKS,

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STUDIO VISIT with Gary Brewer in Art & Cake 2018

The real voyage of discovery consists of not seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes. – Marcel Proust

A medium of communication is not merely a passive conduit for the transmission of information but rather an active force in creating new social patterns and new perceptual realities. – Leonard Shlain, The Alphabet Versus the Goddess

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REVIEW: WhiteHot Magazine by Daniel Maidman

whitehot1

When I was in film school, before the millennium, we were instructed always to reserve some time at the end of shooting in each room. During this time, we were to record several minutes of silence in the room. This “room tone” could then be seamlessly woven in wherever sound editing called for dialogue shot in that space to pause. 

The point of room tone was that the ear can hear a mismatch if two different silences are welded together in the editing. No two silences are alike. Silence is full of timbre. Each room has a personality which comes to the fore in the quiet that falls after its occupants have left.

This concept comes to mind when considering many of the paintings in Kimberly Brooks’s solo show Brazen, at Zevitas Marcus in Los Angeles.

Painting is sight, but some painters naturally summon other senses in service of their imagery. Brooks summons sound, and yet she does not imply noises. She is a painter of silence, of the full, textured silence of room tone. The rooms she depicts are stately and filled with luxurious objects. People have perpetually just vacated them. Their conversations or laughter have fallen away. There is a stuffy close quality to the air. It is trapped and moves only in tiny currents. The personality of these rooms comes into focus now that they are empty.

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