SENSE & SENSIBILITY, Mt. SAC, CA 2013 Curated by Fatemeh Burnes

"A Soul Selects Her Own Society" Kimberly Brooks

“Sense & Sensibility” Mt. San Antonio College, Curated by Fatemeh Burnes, Sept 2013
Artist Panel: Sunday Sept 15, 3:00 – 4:00 pm
Artist Reception: Sunday Sept 15, 4:00 – 6:00 pm

CARL BERG KIMBERLY BROOKS SCOTT CANTY SETH CURCIO SHANA NYS DAMBROT AMIR FALLAH PETER FRANK JULIE HENSON MARGARET LAZZARI DAVID MICHAEL LEE MATTHEW MAY MICHAEL MILLER CHRISTOPHER PATE KATHRYN POINDEXTER MAX PRESNEILL JOHN SEED HK ZAMANI

Gallery Director & Exhibition Curator: Fatemeh Burnes
Gallery Staff: Cynthia Orr, David McIntosh
General Information (909) 594-5611, ext. 4328
Gallery Hours: Tuesday – Thurs, 11:00 am – 2:00 pm
Tuesday, 5:00 – 7:30 pm
Exhibition Catalog Avail
Art Gallery Admission: Free

Mt. San Antonio College
Art Gallery
1100 N. Grand Avenue
Walnut, CA 91789

IMAGE: “A Soul Selects Her Own Society” Kimberly Brooks

FOREST FROM THE TREES, White Box Contemporary, San Diego, CA 2013

"Her Majesty" 20 x 16 in. Oil on LInen

WHITEBOX CONTEMPORARY
is pleased to present
“The Forest from the Trees”
Curated by Chris Trueman and Joshua Dildine
August 10, 2013 – September 10, 2013

Reception: August 10, 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

White Box Contemporary
1040 7th Avenue
San Diego, CA 92101
619-237-8813

Kimberly Brooks
Kathleen Melian
Elizabeth Anne Sobieski
Erica Stallones

www.whiteboxcontemporary.com/forest

SAN DIEGO, CA– White Box Contemporary is pleased to present The Forest From the Trees, an exhibition of four figurative painters from Los Angeles co-curated by Chris Trueman and Joshua Dildine. The Exhibit will run from August 10 – Sept 10, 2013. The Gallery will host a reception August 10, 7-10 PM.

The artists, Kimberly Brooks, Anne-Elizabeth Sobieski, Kathleen Melian and Erica Ryan Stallones, predominant figure painters –but not in the strict tradition of portrait or academic studies– depict characters which are defined as much by their pictorial environment as the very physicality and treatment of paint that defines their presence within the painting.

The impetus for this exhibition came originally from a conversation between the artist/curators Chris Trueman and Joshua Dildine that began with the questions: What if two primarily abstract artists curated an exhibition of figurative paintings and what would they seek in such work? The answer to these questions turned out to be art and artists who are acutely attentive to the application of the paint and manipulation of materials, and whose choice of subjects were specific and at times extremely personal.

There are several common threads running between the work of these artists. The first is that the application of paint is integral to the content of the work. Much the way abstraction relies on reference, paint application, and material usage to situate the work within an art-historical framework, these artists’ handle paint from precise rendering to loose painterly mark making. The molten passages of Brooks’ and Melian’s lush paintings suggest the intangibility of an image remembered. The clarity of a seemingly insignificant detail in Stallones’ intimate gatherings suggests a clue that defies the photographic reality and blurs the details outside of the focus. Sobieski’s brushwork determines the position in a narrative dichotomy between the domesticated and the wild. By selecting freely from historical styles while presenting intimate subject matter, these artists dissociate the artwork from being strictly representational and tap into larger and broader themes.

The specificity of the depicted subject offers the second main theme that runs among the work of these four artists, particularly in terms of the intimacy of the subjects. Many of the artworks in this exhibition are based on family, friends, home, and pets. Although the subjects of many of these artworks are extremely personal, this is not artwork as documentation, portraiture, or painting as personal therapy. These are artworks about themes such as fragility of home, reconciling personal and cultural narratives, insider and outsider group dynamics, story telling, and the cinematic. It is necessary when viewing this work to examine the whole of the object, the paint, and the style as much as the image and content when deciphering these provocative works.

For more information, contact: Andrew Salazar
salazar@whiteboxcontemporary.com

www.whiteboxcontemporary.com/forest

###

INCOGNITO, Santa Monica Museum of Art, May 2013

Incognito1KimberlyBrooks

Untitled 8 x 10″ Oil on Paper. Kimberly Brooks 2013

SANTA MONICA, CA–INCOGNITO Santa Monica Museum of Art’s highly anticipated annual exhibition and benefit art sale, will return for its ninth year on Saturday, May 11, 2013, accompanied by the second annual PRECOGNITO Gala Dinner and Art Preview event on Thursday, May 9, 2013. Tickets for both events go on sale March 1.  Kimberly Brooks submitted two pieces to the event.

SMOAIncognito2013
The PRECOGNITO gala dinner and preview on May 9 honors gallerist Margo Leavin (introduced by John Baldessari) and opera and theater director Peter Sellars (introduced by Bill Viola).   In its ninth year, INCOGNITO—SMMoA’s distinctive art sale and exhibition—features original artworks by contemporary artists and music by DJ Eddie Ruscha.  Each 8″ x 10″ artwork is signed on the back and artist identities are revealed only after purchase.

INCOGNITO, Southern California’s legendary annual benefit art sale, now in its ninth year, will feature more than 600 original artworks by more than 500 leading, mid-career, and emerging contemporary artists. INCOGNITO 2013 participating artists include Edgar Arceneaux, John Baldessari, Kimberly Brooks, Mark Bradford, Lynda Benglis, Marco Brambilla, Judy Chicago, Luis Gispert, Mary Kelly, Sharon Lockhart, Kim MacConnel, Rodney McMillian, Catherine Opie, Raymond Pettibon, William Pope.L, Ed Ruscha, Betye Saar, Julião Sarmento, and many, many more. A preliminary list of the fabulous array of artists participating in INCOGNITO 2013 will be available when tickets go on sale March 1 at smmoa.org.

All INCOGNITO artworks are the same 8″x10″ size and available for only $350 plus tax. This highly energized evening encourages attendees–from sophisticated art patrons to first-time collectors–to trust their instincts in selecting the works, as each piece is signed on the back and the artists’ identities are revealed only after purchase.

The element of surprise that underlies INCOGNITO reflects the essence of discovery that inspires SMMoA’s exhibitions, education, and outreach programs. One hundred percent of the proceeds from PRECOGNITO/INCOGNITO directly support the Museum.

The Queen 8x10 " oil on paper Kimberly Brooks 2013

The Queen 8×10 ” oil on paper Kimberly Brooks 2013

The Queen 8×10 ” oil on paper Kimberly Brooks 2013

2013 “The Looking Glass: Refraction Through the Female Gaze” Mirus Gallery, San Francisco

Kimberly Brooks Mirus Gallery ARtist

The Looking Glass: Refracting and the Female Gaze. Kimberly Brooks participating in Group Exhibition at Mirus Gallery in San Francisco. Opening night is February 9th, 2013

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Danielle Grant | A&O PR
(P) 415.860.0767 | (E) danielle@aopublic.com

Mirus Gallery Presents:

The Looking Glass
Refraction through the Female Gaze

Claire Pestaille, Stargate (III), Collage, 2012

Opening Reception: February 9th, 2013 | 6pm – 10pm
Exhibition Dates: February 9 – March 2, 2013

Mirus Gallery | 540 Howard Street | San Francisco, CA

SAN FRANCISCO, January 22, 2013 — Mirus Gallery is pleased to announce The Looking Glass: Refraction through the Female Gaze, a group exhibition featuring works by Kimberly Brooks, Sandra Chevrier, Naja Conrad-Hansen, Mercedes Helnwein, Alexandra Levasseur, Jen Mann, Sari Maxfield, Alyssa Monks, Jennifer Nehrbass, Casey O’Connell, Claire Pestaille, Rachel Walker, Janelle Wisehart and Christine Wu. The Looking Glass is the third exhibition to be presented by the newly opened Mirus Gallery, and will examine contemporary representations of the female form. The Looking Glass reinterprets the presentation of women’s bodies through a variety of mediums and practices unified by subject matter and a solely female perspective.

The artists featured in the The Looking Glass challenge the preconceived notion that the female form in art represents a sense of delicacy and untouchable beauty. Creating a new discourse and exploring the woman’s role in artistic context, The Looking Glass is a celebration of the female form that ultimately transcends objectification through the artist’s examination or association with their subjects. Rather than using the female body as an agenda to reinforce societal norms or assert dominance, the artists are able to identify with and explore the spectrum of their subject’s humanity, often as an exercise in self-examination and exploration. The works of art featured in this show are a contemporary examination of the psychology of art practice and explore alternative realms in which the female body is represented.

Kimberly Brooks investigates the role of women as both artists and subjects of the gaze. By inverting the artist-model relationship her practice aims to breakdown the traditional role of spectator, allowing her model the agency to look out from the canvas and stare back at the viewer. In examining contemporary fashion and style, Brooks addresses the role that women themselves play in the perpetuation of certain cultural tropes, and the significance of appearance in depictions of women in art and media.

The work of Rachel Walker borders upon the abstract and the illustrative, presenting the previously marginalized perspectives of female and queer artists. Her works in gouache support an immediacy and honesty in her subject matter, the rapidness required by the medium lends itself to an art practice based upon intuition and chance. The use of feminine cultural figures, fashion and historical imagery assists in her exploration of depictions of race, gender, sexuality and identity.

Mercedes Helnwein examines the myth of the “normal” through her drawings of women and girls outside of the mass media lexicon. With an outsider’s attention to the seemingly banal, Helnwein draws out the eccentricities, oddities and cultural mash up she finds thriving in the backwaters of American life. The exactness of emotion allowed by her use of pencil bring to surface some of the inner struggles and temptations masked by her female subject’s need to “be good”.

Claire Pestaille’s collages challenge a consumer culture that dictates the relentless pursuit of perfection by examining how advertising, Hollywood and other media inform women’s self image. By focusing on the female form, Pestaille is able to bring awareness to women’s experience outside of standardized art historical portrayals. In promoting self acceptance and understanding, she allows her female subjects to be storytellers for themselves, liberated from societal standards and stereotypes.

Approaching her practice as a dialog between her adolescent self, and the woman she is now, Casey O’Connell paints in acrylic and oil stain as a scrapbook of her life and emotions. Her use of female characters lends itself to greater intimacy and relevance to her personal experience, with imagery meeting somewhere between fantasy and honesty.

Mirus Gallery is a dynamic exhibition space established by entrepreneur, Paul Hemming. The gallery features a program of contemporary artwork by emerging and mid-career artists in both solo and thematically organized group shows. Mirus Gallery will highlight work that emphasizes skill and process and aims to engage viewers on a sentient, emotional and evocative level.

In 2013, the initiation of an artist-in-residency program will pursue the gallery’s values of community and collaboration by providing a live-in/on-site studio space for artists to make and exhibit work in a supportive environment, conducive to creativity.

Gallery Hours
Tuesday – Saturday 10-6

Location
540 Howard Street
San Francisco, CA
94105

Gallery Contact
monica@mirusgallery.com

Media Contact
Danielle Grant
danielle@aopublic.com
415.860.0767

PENNSYLVANIA ACADEMY OF FINE ART, Forum on Race and Gender, February

logo

1437

PAFA’s Samuel M. V. Hamilton Building
128 N. Broad Street, Philadelphia
FREE Admission, REGISTER NOW

Panelists:
Ken Johnson,The New York Times, Art Critic
Kimberly Brooks, Artist and Founding Editor of Huffington Post Arts
Njideka Akunyili, Artist
Joyce Kozloff, Artist
Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw (moderator), University of Pennsylvania Associate Professor of American Art

A New York Times preview of PAFA’s current exhibition The Female Gaze: Women Artists Making Their World, written by art critic Ken Johnson, sparked a debate around gender and race in regards to art criticism. An open letter, which focuses on this preview, as well as Johnson’s article about the exhibition Now Dig This!: Art and Black Los Angeles 1960-1980 (at MoMA PS1), was signed by many artists, art historians, curators and others.

PAFA’s forum brings together members of the art community and the public for a lively debate around these questions:

What role does identity politics play in the contemporary art world?

How do gender and race play into the art we make, the art we collect and exhibit, and the way we talk about the merits of a work of art?

Join the conversation! REGISTER NOW.

NEW AMERICAN PAINTINGS Must-See Painting Exhibitions

The art world comes alive again in September, as galleries reopen and collectors return from far flung locations. We reviewed upcoming September exhibitions at more than 400 galleries around the country, and there will be a lot of painting on view.

As is typical, many galleries are bringing out the big guns for the new season – from Agnes Martin at The Pace Gallery in New York to a well structured survey of Bay Area figurative painter, Nathan Oliveira, at John Berggruen Gallery in San Francisco. Among the shows opening by emerging artists, it is hard to ignore the trend towards abstract painting that has swept over the art world.

Kimberly Brooks | “The Passage”  40 x 30 in. Oil on Linen 2011

Kimberly Brooks “Thread” * Editors Pick
Taylor De Cordoba Sept 10 – Oct 22
Read whole article >

LACMA “Art, Fame & Fashion” Presentation

photo by Aleji Tenutta

Art Bistro- Review
by Emily Waldorf

The Stylist Project Asks, “Is Fashion Art?”

On Wednesday, April 21, LACMA’s Costume Council featured a brilliant presentation by artist Kimberly Brooks, “Art, Fame, and Fashion.” Brooks recently completed the Los Angeles component of the The Stylist Project, a series of oil paintings that will eventually be turned into a book. The Stylist Project hones in on today’s fashion influences and explores the delicate question of whether fashion is art and whether stylists are artists.

Brooks is represented by Taylor de Cordoba Gallery and her work has been featured in the Los Angeles Times, Art Ltd., The Huffington Post, Vanity Fair, Elle, C Magazine, as well as at juried shows at the Whitney and MoMA. For The Stylist Project, Brooks researched who today’s top trendsetters are, and asked them to sit for her in her studio in their own clothes. Her creative process includes taking hundreds of images of her subjects and then creating a maquette to work from. She lists the work of Henri Matisse and David Hockney as inspiration, which is clear through the sun-drenched colors and formal composition of her gorgeous paintings.

Brooks’ subjects include bold-faced L.A. fashion luminary names including Elizabeth Stewart, Liz Goldywn, Katherine Ross, Jeremy Scott, Jeanne Yang, Andrea Lieberman, and Rachel Zoe, among others. Part 2 of The Stylist Project is focused on New York’s haute fashionistas and will debut in Spring 2011. During her presentation, Brooks challenged the hierarchy of fine art versus applied arts and asked why hanging something on your wall is different than hanging something in your closet. She concluded that paintings can last hundreds of years but fashion is ephemeral by nature, so stylists are “artists of the everyday.”

Brooks’ presentation concluded with a roundtable discussion with two fashion stylistswho posed for her for The Stylist Project, Jeanne Yang and Elizabeth Stewart.

“Coming Together”: Group Show

KIMBERLY BROOKS
ANDREW FOSTER
RIVES GRANADE
SYDNEY LITTENBERG
SEAN P. MCGAUGHERTY
ANNE-ELIZABETH SOBIESKI

COMING TOGETHER
A POP UP PAINTING EXHIBITION

FEBRUARY 3 – 18, 2012
OPENING: FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 7 – 10 PM

PRESENTED BY SONNY RUSCHA BOJRNSON
& LAURA GROVER
HOSTED BY FABIEN FRYNS FINE ART
314 N. CRESCENT HEIGHTS BLVD.
LOS ANGELES, CA 90048
WWW.FABIENFRYNS.COM
323.998.6236 INFO@FABIENFRYNS.COM

James Scarborough: Irretrievable Beauty

Kimberly Brooks’s “Thread” at Taylor De Cordoba is neither about fashion nor the women who bring it to life but about how fashion lives but for the moment it’s worn. It’s about the expectations that clothes elicit, and once those expectations are met, memories of the occasion create attempts to rekindle the irretrievable beauty of, say, a “Sunset Boulevard” Gloria Swanson. As such, the show offers a metaphor of aging: we do, style does, and, as is the case here, specific time spent in the particular clothes does.

The show waxes lugubrious, the result of waiting for something or someone that doesn’t arrive. The faces are bland and featureless. Some appear in shadows and, in certain instances, are shadows. Some appear waxen as if at a wake, their wake, while others appear as if at a macabre masquerade ball. The overall effect is that of a post-apocalyptic fashion show (a nice image for looking back on one’s youth), with art direction by Tim Burton, refracted through Goya or Velazquez, and scripted by Cormac McCarthy.

Not so much feminine as asexual, the farthest thing imaginable from elegant or chic, the women may strike a conscious pose – they know their likeness is being captured – but they all look shrink-wrapped. Their model’s hardly-modeled face epitomizes blah, a state of couture obsolescence and personal irrelevance. The woman in Highrise clearly articulates, while the rest allude to alienation, not just from their clothes, their environment, but from themselves. Hardly comfortable in their clothes, they are even less comfortable in their skin, much less their lives.

Kimberly Brooks | “Highrise” 12 x 16 oil on linen 2011

The portraits feel cartoonish; this strikes a nice dynamic between high fashion and lowbrow culture. The women in The Confidant and Punk History have heads that look as if they’re about to be teleported to another solar system, giving them a sci-fi sense. Though their titles (Punk History, The Victorian) suggest specific eras, these two women in particular and the rest of them in general are not of that time and place or any time or place. They seem like re-imaginings of better days that were never better in the first place and thus have a treacly feeling, a Francis Bacon feeling, as if they’re disintegrating at an atomic level, from the inside out. A female version of Edvard Munch’s The Scream in a Stella McCartney dress wouldn’t feel out of place here.



Kimberly Brooks | “The Victorian” 50 x 30 in. Oil on Linen 2011

Perhaps failed romance brings the women to this state of alienation. The posture of the woman in Bing Theatre suggests that she’s been spurned. The red seatback behind the woman in Soho House suggests a heart, as does the blue shape behind the man in The Passage. The Passage could conceivably be a marriage portrait, if it didn’t look as if someone tried to rub out the image of the man (and which could conceivably have led to the solitary woman in the claustrophobic Edward Hopperesque “Highrise”).

 

Kimberly Brooks | “The Passage” 40 x 30 in. Oil on Linen 2011

The exhibition reads like a designer’s preliminary sketch laid out on a storyboard, ready to be fleshed out. It offers a keen and incisive commentary on the user-end expectations of fashion: to be escorted by a man, to turn heads at galas, theaters, and commemorative portraits, all of which in retrospect result either in prettified mummies or else in sitters who are a lot more lonely than their attire and setting would suggest.

Review Link