2019 EXHIBITION: “Disclosure” at Durden & Ray, Los Angeles

DISCLOSURE: CONFESSIONS FOR MODERN TIMES

Jan 5 – Feb 2, 2019
Opening reception:
Saturday, Jan. 5, 2019,
7-10 p.m

Artists: Kim Abeles, Jorin Bossen, Kimberly Brooks, Joe Davidson, Dani Dodge, Donald Fodness, Kathryn Hart, Debby and Larry Kline, Conchi Sanford, Ed “Celso” Tahaney and Steven Wolkoff, Curators: Dani Dodge and Alanna Marcelletti

Durden and Ray will celebrate the start of 2019 with an exhibition that allows people to cleanse their souls through the art of disclosure. January is about cleansing the past and making new starts. But since the early 1990s, independent polls have shown the rapid growth of those without a religious affiliation. So where do people go to confess, if not to a higher power? Maybe an art gallery? Dani Dodge and Alanna Marcelletti decided to play devil’s advocates and create a space where the participants can disclose transgressions and progress unfettered into 2019 through art.

The exhibition includes interactive confessionals, each designed by different artists, and figurative art exploring the experience of being human through relationships, tragedy, translation of autobiography and Barry Manilow. The show is a contemporary take on the sacred and secular acts of confessing sins. Conchi Sanford’s confessional is composed of two see-through cocoons that allow people to whisper secrets to each other. Steven Wolkoff channels Bart Simpson with a piece on which people write what they will not do. Inside Kim Abeles’ confessional, people hear the sound of audio she collected one minute every day for 1440 minutes, or 24 hours, and Dani Dodge’s formal wooden confessional flashes “CONFESS” while inviting people to put their sins on display through Post-it notes. The figurative works in the show acknowledge the burden of unreleased guilt. Aesthetically, they are divided by the curators into their ideas of heaven, hell and in-between. Kimberly Brooks’ abstract figures exist in a heavenly realm, while Donald Fodness hellishly disassembles Barry Manilow. Debby and Larry Kline play prophet by mapping impending tragedy for the planet referencing Biblical plagues as they foretell natural and manmade disasters. In between are the paintings of a disconnected relationship by Jorin Bossen, and Ed “Celso” Tahaney’s vibrant take on the personal disclosures of Hollywood luminaries. Joe Davidson memorializes a life lived through concrete castings of the insides of his own shoes, while Kathryn Hart reveals her personal form of survivor guilt with a sculpture that includes found bone, which she refers to as a private confessional.

Durden & Ray
1206 Maple Ave. #832, Los Angeles, CA 90015
Hours: Sat/Sun, 12 – 5 p.m. and by appointment

Media Contact:
Dani Dodge, 213-703-9363
dani.dodge@gmail.com

ARTILLERY Review “Pick of the Week” by Annabel Osberg

Russian Room, 42 x 36 in., Oil on linen 2018

by Annabel Osborne

Calling all Kimberly Brooks fans: A short time remains to catch “Fever Dreams,” her mid-career survey at Mt. San Antonio College Art Gallery. More than 20 pieces, from small studies to watercolors on paper to large-scale oil paintings, sketch Brooks’ artistic progression over the past 15 years. Upon entering the gallery, the first paintings you encounter are among her newest and shiniest. All opulence and emptiness, these recent interiors evoke the desolate nostalgia of attending long-uninhabited historic sites such as homes, temples or palaces now unused except by visiting tourists. In paintings such as Altar (2018) and Chandelier(2018), thin washy passages of bare underpainting peep through mirror-like lattices of crinkly gold and silver leaf. Conveying an antiquated effect, the impromptu air and faded coloration of Brooks’ muted washes counterpoint the grandiose resplendence of her veined metallic overlays appearing as sumptuous skeletons of what once was. The inability to adequately imagine the distant past as described in history books and museums is clearly a key inspiration for Brooks’ hazily painted portrayals of venerable settings. Blank paintings within paintings appear to have mysteriously vanished from ornate frames. Adorning faintly painted museum walls, gilt-framed indistinct sub-pictures sport nondescript subjects. Several compositions recalling Renaissance-style tapestries, including Los Angeles (2018), feature obfuscated figures and nebulous landscapes evoking blurry reveries of vague recollections. Memory of the Banquet (2013) is particularly memorable, almost surreal, with a table floating amid gray throngs superimposed upon barren wilderness. Brooks’ watercolors from the early 2000’s portray more intimate scenes of cocktail parties, parks and lived-in rooms; yet they, too, are suffused with a dreamy sense of wistful detachment.

Mt. San Antonio College Art Gallery
Building 1B/1C
1100 N. Grand Ave.
Walnut, CA 91789
Show runs through Dec. 6

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MASTER CLASS @ Otis this Spring 2019

INTERMEDIATE OIL PAINTING

Join Artist Kimberly Brooks for this intermediate painting workshop where students will refine their techniques and personal style when approaching the canvas. Students will be exposed to practical techniques involving building different types of grounds, color mixing, and when to employ tightness vs. looseness.  Brooks will share various techniques for embracing every stage in the life cycle of creating a work of art as well as assembling a body of work for exhibition.  With an emphasis on safe studio practices, this class will teach techniques for Oil Painting (used by Rembrandt and Velasquez) that minimize exposure to toxic chemicals.

Kimberly Brooks is the first recipient of the Franklyn Leigel Award for Teaching Excellence 2016.

Prerequisite: drawing and composition, introduction to painting: material and techniques. Erolled students will be given an itemized list of basic painting materials and colors.

SIGN UP TODAY

REVIEW: WhiteHot Magazine by Daniel Maidman

whitehot1

When I was in film school, before the millennium, we were instructed always to reserve some time at the end of shooting in each room. During this time, we were to record several minutes of silence in the room. This “room tone” could then be seamlessly woven in wherever sound editing called for dialogue shot in that space to pause. 

The point of room tone was that the ear can hear a mismatch if two different silences are welded together in the editing. No two silences are alike. Silence is full of timbre. Each room has a personality which comes to the fore in the quiet that falls after its occupants have left.

This concept comes to mind when considering many of the paintings in Kimberly Brooks’s solo show Brazen, at Zevitas Marcus in Los Angeles.

Painting is sight, but some painters naturally summon other senses in service of their imagery. Brooks summons sound, and yet she does not imply noises. She is a painter of silence, of the full, textured silence of room tone. The rooms she depicts are stately and filled with luxurious objects. People have perpetually just vacated them. Their conversations or laughter have fallen away. There is a stuffy close quality to the air. It is trapped and moves only in tiny currents. The personality of these rooms comes into focus now that they are empty.

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