FOREST FROM THE TREES, White Box Contemporary, San Diego, CA 2013

"Her Majesty" 20 x 16 in. Oil on LInen

WHITEBOX CONTEMPORARY
is pleased to present
“The Forest from the Trees”
Curated by Chris Trueman and Joshua Dildine
August 10, 2013 – September 10, 2013

Reception: August 10, 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

White Box Contemporary
1040 7th Avenue
San Diego, CA 92101
619-237-8813

Kimberly Brooks
Kathleen Melian
Elizabeth Anne Sobieski
Erica Stallones

www.whiteboxcontemporary.com/forest

SAN DIEGO, CA– White Box Contemporary is pleased to present The Forest From the Trees, an exhibition of four figurative painters from Los Angeles co-curated by Chris Trueman and Joshua Dildine. The Exhibit will run from August 10 – Sept 10, 2013. The Gallery will host a reception August 10, 7-10 PM.

The artists, Kimberly Brooks, Anne-Elizabeth Sobieski, Kathleen Melian and Erica Ryan Stallones, predominant figure painters –but not in the strict tradition of portrait or academic studies– depict characters which are defined as much by their pictorial environment as the very physicality and treatment of paint that defines their presence within the painting.

The impetus for this exhibition came originally from a conversation between the artist/curators Chris Trueman and Joshua Dildine that began with the questions: What if two primarily abstract artists curated an exhibition of figurative paintings and what would they seek in such work? The answer to these questions turned out to be art and artists who are acutely attentive to the application of the paint and manipulation of materials, and whose choice of subjects were specific and at times extremely personal.

There are several common threads running between the work of these artists. The first is that the application of paint is integral to the content of the work. Much the way abstraction relies on reference, paint application, and material usage to situate the work within an art-historical framework, these artists’ handle paint from precise rendering to loose painterly mark making. The molten passages of Brooks’ and Melian’s lush paintings suggest the intangibility of an image remembered. The clarity of a seemingly insignificant detail in Stallones’ intimate gatherings suggests a clue that defies the photographic reality and blurs the details outside of the focus. Sobieski’s brushwork determines the position in a narrative dichotomy between the domesticated and the wild. By selecting freely from historical styles while presenting intimate subject matter, these artists dissociate the artwork from being strictly representational and tap into larger and broader themes.

The specificity of the depicted subject offers the second main theme that runs among the work of these four artists, particularly in terms of the intimacy of the subjects. Many of the artworks in this exhibition are based on family, friends, home, and pets. Although the subjects of many of these artworks are extremely personal, this is not artwork as documentation, portraiture, or painting as personal therapy. These are artworks about themes such as fragility of home, reconciling personal and cultural narratives, insider and outsider group dynamics, story telling, and the cinematic. It is necessary when viewing this work to examine the whole of the object, the paint, and the style as much as the image and content when deciphering these provocative works.

For more information, contact: Andrew Salazar
salazar@whiteboxcontemporary.com

www.whiteboxcontemporary.com/forest

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